Stereotyping is wrong, negative or positive

Updated on March 22, 2022 in Arguing About Arguing
8 on November 1, 2019

Positive stereotypes are wrong.

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7 on February 24, 2022

I disagree. Stereotypes are often formed by events in the past that allow people to foresee future events based on what has already happened. For example the Balkans is also known as the Powder Keg Region because it is prone to battles and skirmishes. This is just a historical fact. A positive stereotype is that women tend to be more compassionate. This is also a fact.

on March 20, 2022

Stereotypes are extrapolating base information to form and publicize strong opinions about people and labeling them into a certain category. We learn in school and in all places that “no two people are the same”, so why is it then, that we attempt to cage people into a label based on their gender, their beliefs, their nationality, their race, their religion, etc.? Yes, statistics do provide information about the majority, but in a world where every single person argues for equal representation of the minorities, is it fair to denominate people and profile them to seem as though they have to have certain qualities? Psychology statistics show that personality tests, stereotypes, and other profiling methods create an increase in expectations upon people to act a certain way whether they are inclined to act that way or not. Humans are so vast and mutable that it is erroneous to simply brand them in a manner be it positive or negative.  

on March 21, 2022

I still disagree. I’m Italian and from my experiences, we are very loud. That’s not to say that there aren’t any quiet Italians, but the stereotype is humorous and true. I’m not for labeling people but we can’t destroy every aspect of this for basic functional reasons and for our ability to laugh. I don’t care if you’re not Italian, make a joke about us, it’s funny.

on March 21, 2022

Your opinion upon stereotypes is based on your history with stereotypes, however, in a more nationalistic and global perspective, certain stereotypes aren’t considered “funny”, because its basically caging a person and a group of people to seem as though they act in a certain way, because of the action of some of the people in that category. Stereotypes are also one of the leading reasons for racism, sexism, and other origin-based backlash. 

on March 21, 2022

So you believe that stereotypes are the reason for “racism” and “sexism?” It depends on how you take it. You either think it’s funny, true, or dumb. It’s not worth getting upset over. There is no systemic racism or sexism so it doesn’t make sense to apply something like stereotypes to a problem within the individual, it’s not society’s problem. You can choose to have sexist and racist beliefs, or you could be a little more optimistic and laugh. If I saw someone actually being racist I would defend the victim, but if I saw people make a racial joke and they all laugh I would wonder what was so funny. It’s just not something worth getting upset about when there are other actual problems in the world. It is not fair to tell me I can’t stereotype something or someone with good intentions because it’s a factor of racism. I’m not racist so I’m not going to be subject to being told that I am. It is within the individual to make the choice to be racist or sexist and it is their choice if they act on those thoughts. I will do what I can to defend someone against these problems but I’m not going to let my own basic beliefs be crushed because others take this minute concept so offensively. If I say women are more compassionate, take it as a compliment if you’re a girl.

on March 21, 2022

I seem to have not specified accurately. I enjoy psychology and have researched on a variety of topics and I came across data that implied that stereotypes and negative stereotyping in essence promote racist and sexist behavior. As you stated, it depends on the way you perceive something, but simply labeling a group of people in both negative and positive ways attempts to constrict human traits and personalities. Humans are so versatile and by categorizing them, we are simply creating a wall which many can’t escape. You state that “woman are more compassionate”, but as a girl I can tell you that I am one of the least compassionate people you will meet. Are you then suggesting that I am not a girl, or that it is incorrect for me to not be compassionate because according to your beliefs a women should be more compassionate than a man?(I am going to go on a whim here and just assume you are of the female sex). In any case let me pose another question to you. The common misconception and stereotype is that “women are weak”, but there is not ANY substantial proof, to support this. Then, basing off of your argument, are you stating that one is to simply accept this statement in a humorous manner, when in reality, society itself has been constructed under the misinformed basis of this sexist and male chauvinistic view? Or are you suggesting that positive stereotypes are acceptable, but negative stereotypes, depending on the severity, should be discarded? Where the do you propose we draw the line between offensive and innocent? Then let me also ask you another question- what purpose and significance do stereotypes serve in society? How do we benefit from them?

on March 22, 2022

I don’t think people should feel the need to live up to stereotypes such as women being more compassionate. If people feel bad about themselves for not living up to their stereotypes, that is their problem. It is how they take it. I don’t question your femininity just because you say you are not compassionate. If stereotypes become a problem within society, yeah we should do something about that. For example, a company hires people based on their race. That’s messed up, but instead of calling all stereotypes bad in the name of racism and all isms why don’t we recognize that some are in good conscience, or maybe some are just true. If we don’t normalize some stereotypes, they will be used by actual racist people, then it is ruined for everybody. As we restrict these basic human interactions, we further ourselves from what we are trying to achieve. CocaCola is trying to change people’s “whiteness.” That’s terrible and it would still be terrible with any other race. This did not happen until it was normalized to be offended by nearly everything. We should care for people but as we become overly concerned about the feelings of people we restrict many aspects of life that give it its reality and experiences. There’s a stereotype that Asians have high intelligence. I have an Asian friend and he happens to be extremely smart. From my experiences, this stereotype has been true, and I say this with respect and honor for Asian people. To say that stereotypes are bad simply because isms can stem from them doesn’t mean that we abolish it completely. Imagine a society with no stereotypes.

on March 22, 2022

I completely respect your opinion on the importance of stereotypes and I agree that a society without stereotypes would be posed with its own set of discrepancies with this new generation of extremely sensitive people and their extremely sensitive views, I realize that we cannot achieve absolute happiness in any manner or we would simply end up in a society similar to that in Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (please read if you are passionately against book censorship and all these modern movements against anything that could be potentially offensive in any manner). However, for the sake of an argument, stereotypes are used negatively, the majority of the time. At this point in society, people have formed extremely opinionated views upon people, and groups of people. Stereotypes are essentially” the idea that everyone within a certain group shares the same characteristics”. Sure, in most manners this will seem simply normal to you, but negative stereotypes not only impact the demographic’s mind but rather the mind of the people placing those stereotypes. Being an Indian, others perceive me to be “smart” and “good at math” and they expect me to act in a certain manner that may be far from my interests. From personal experience, I can tell you stories in which students have asked me why I can speak English so well, or why I have such a good vocabulary, because they expect an immigrant such as me to struggle with things they consider “normal”, and they also presume that I should be automatically good at subjects such as math and science. These presumptions potentially stem certain isms. Would the above-mentioned expectations not describe racism? I am personally against the extreme caution people are expected to practice because of sensitive people who wish to point out every mild discrepancy and to extrapolate those discrepancies, but at the same time, as humans, should we not do anything we can to ensure that some of these negative and conservative mindsets change and to open up the world into an era of acceptance? While some stereotypes are good we should be able to draw the line between humor and humiliation. Aren’t stereotypes just a modernized class and segregation system? That may seem a little extreme, but humans are judgemental creatures and we use expectations and beliefs to contort truths and create new expectations. In the modern era, certain gender-related stereotypes have been challenged. Old-fashioned ideas that some toys are just for boys, or that women should stay home while men work have been questioned and progress has been made, yet the more we advocate for negative stereotypes to be put in use, the more we find ourselves in a position where there are millions of movements advocating for extreme compression of our right to free speech. By drawing the appropriate line between jokes and libel, we achieve a somewhat perfect balance to maintain our freedom of speech, while being mindful of personal preferences. This was a long response, but if you haven’t noticed, I love to argue so 🙂   

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